The DOL has posted an FAQ page regarding FFCRA. The following are a few questions and answers from that page:

If my employer closed my worksite before April 1, 2020 (the effective date of the FFCRA), can I still get paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave?

No. If, prior to the FFCRA’s effective date, your employer sent you home and stops paying you because it does not have work for you to do, you will not get paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave but you may be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. This is true whether your employer closes your worksite for lack of business or because it is required to close pursuant to a Federal, State, or local directive. You should contact your State workforce agency or State unemployment insurance office for specific questions about your eligibility. For additional information, please refer to this website.

If my employer closes my worksite on or after April 1, 2020 (the effective date of the FFCRA), but before I go out on leave, can I still get paid sick leave and/or expanded family and medical leave?

No. If your employer closes after the FFCRA’s effective date (even if you requested leave prior to the closure), you will not get paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave but you may be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. This is true whether your employer closes your worksite for lack of business or because it was required to close pursuant to a Federal, State or local directive. You should contact your State workforce agency or State unemployment insurance office for specific questions about your eligibility. For additional information, please refer to this website.

 

BRSW Note: If you read the law it states someone can qualify if that employee is subject to a Federal, State, or local quarantine or isolation order.  It appears there is a distinction the DOL is making between a business being closed by Federal, State or local directive (non-essential business) and an employee that is subject to a Federal, State or local quarantine or isolation order. It must not be enough to be closed as a non-essential business, instead it appears that there must be an actual COVID-19 incident that causes the employees to go into quarantine.